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Meaglow Plasma Source Provides Breakthrough for Advanced Semiconductor Production Technique

Meaglow Ltd. (Privately Held) announces a breakthrough in semiconductor production. As computer chips become smaller and smaller, advanced production techniques, such as Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) have become more important for depositing thin layers of material. Unfortunately the ALD of some materials has been prone to contamination from the plasma sources used. Meaglow Ltd has developed a hollow cathode plasma source which has reduced oxygen contamination by orders of magnitude, allowing the reproducible deposition of semiconductor materials with improved quality.

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Meaglow Commercializing InGaN

Meaglow Yellow LED

THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO.—August 30, 2012—Meaglow Ltd. (Privately Held) announces its low temperature Migration Enhanced Afterglow film growth technique has been used to produce a thick Indium Gallium Nitride (InGaN) layer with strong yellow emission. This recent result bodes well to increase the efficiency and lower production costs of green LEDs and laser diodes. The company is currently seeking collaboration opportunities to enhance the material properties required by industry for lighting, display, medical, and military applications among other uses.

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Meaglow Front Cover Feature of Compound Semiconductor Magazine

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Today Meaglow was the feature story in or Magazine in an  article entitled Slashing Temperatures for Nitride Growth. The article discusses Meaglow Ltd. technology in comparison to MOCVD, the Meaglow  growth technique and applications to industry as well as a background on one of the founder, Dr. Scott Butcher.
 
Atomic Force Microscopy
left: Migration enhanced overflow can form Ga-face GaN films with a thickness of 200 nm at 630 ºC. Atomic force microscopy reveal that the root-mean-square surface roughness of this film is 0.23 nm. Molecular terraces can be distinguished in the image. Above right: Atomic force microscopy reveals that the InN surface has a root-mean-square roughness of 0.1 nm and features molecular terraces.
 
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